Persistent Easterly Flow


Starting overnight April 9th into April 10th when a cold front passed bringing scattered showers and strong westerly winds. High pressure then began to slide eastwards from New England, clockwise flow around high pressure allowed winds in Bermuda to decrease and shift more to the northwest and north through the day on the 10th. This same high pressure continued eastward, shifting to a position north of Bermuda. Again, clockwise flow around the high resulted in winds shifting from the north through northeast and ending in a more easterly direction on the 11th.

April 9th’s cold front had become stationary to the far east of Bermuda and extended in an arc to the south of Bermuda. This and a blocking upper atmospheric pattern slowed the progression of the high to the north of Bermuda. This kept winds between northeasterly and easterly through the weekend (April 12th and 13th). The part of the stationary front to the south of Bermuda dissipated leaving behind a east-west oriented trough. This trough became inverted (north-south oriented with lower pressures to the south) south of Bermuda on the 13th and began slowly moving westward around the high pressure centered to the north of Bermuda. The inverted trough began to influence the weather in Bermuda late on the 13th and through the 14th as easterly winds increased to strong and some light showers were introduced. Strong easterly winds became more east-southeasterly and eventually southeasterly on the 15th as the inverted trough continued westward, passing Bermuda to the south, meanwhile, the high to the north of Bermuda also began to shift more to the east, and clockwise flow around the high, now centered to the northeast of Bermuda, also contributed to that wind shift.

Bermuda Weather Service surface analysis of the North Atlantic at 2pm local time April 16th 2014.
Bermuda Weather Service surface analysis of the North Atlantic at 2pm local time April 16th 2014. At this time, you can see the high pressure centered to the northeast of Bermuda with maximum central pressure of 1035mb.

The inverted trough elongated and is now interacting with an approaching cold front that is currently located just off the US east coast. Southeasterly flow continues today and through to the weekend, becoming more southerly as high pressure remains to the northeast of Bermuda. This should allow warmer, more humid than normal weather. A relatively non-progressive pattern is taking shape and the front along the US east coast is not expected to reach Bermuda. However, remnants from the inverted trough may return eastward enough to introduce some showers in the forecast for Bermuda on Thursday and Friday.

Some forecast model solution suggest an area of low pressure developing in the Gulf of Mexico, along a stationary front related to the cold front currently just off the US east coast. This low, should if develop, would track across the Florida Peninsula into the southwestern Atlantic and potentially bring inclement/adverse weather to Bermuda in the next 7 to 10 days. Stay informed by following the regularly updated forecasts for Bermuda by the Bermuda Weather Service.

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